Wax prints

Did you know that Easter is a really big deal here in New Zealand I had a mandatory 5 day holiday from work?

Also all the shops are closed on Good Friday & Easter Sunday (except in Wanaka, WTF?!).  I decided to have a sewing stay-cation, since we are going away in May anyway, and I really just wanted to have a nice, quiet, relaxing few days away from work.

On a side note, there’s been a lot of discussion about Easter trading laws here in New Zealand (you can get a haircut but not buy hairspray, you can drink a beer with your meal, but not buy a beer?) but the one thing no one seems to mention is the religious background of this holiday and it’s appropriateness for a multi-cultural society.  I don’t mind restrictions on trade – it’s nice to have a few days where shops must be shut, and I think the unions have been hugely influential and ensuring that workers have the right to time off on public holidays, which I applaud, but why does it have to be Christian doctrine dictating which days those are?

Why not have “Autumnal splendour day” or something instead of “Easter”?  Because, just in case you were not aware, it is not spring time here.

Anyway back to my sewing stay-cation:

Lately I am obsessed with West African wax prints, perhaps getting nostalgic for my days in Athieme, Benin?

I found a good supplier – Africanpremier.com, with some pretty amazing prints, like the ones below:

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The minimum purchase is “une piece”, which is enough to make a “complet” (6 meters).  Some examples of fabulous African ladies in their “complet”:

 

Senegalese+daily+wear

As much as I would love to rock some serious African style here in Wellington, I prefer to mix and match my wax prints with typical Western-wear.

I have made about 4 pairs of trousers using  Burda 7486

 

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The top is hideous! But trousers version “C”  are great for making cotton pants with a zipper fly, so I don’t feel like a disgusting slob who wears elastic waist pants to work.  They have just enough ease for non-knit fabrics so you don’t feel like you are going to bust a seam but you have a skinny-leg style.  So far I have made 4 pairs of wax print trousers with this pattern – which are great with a solid colour shirt and even appropriate for the office.  That being said I am an academic so dress standards are fairly lose around my workplace.

(Photos coming soon)

I have also made a number of dresses – mostly not using any kind of pattern, but based on another dress I have.  However I did recently take a “make patterns from your existing wardrobe” course and have drafted a pattern for my new favourite simple shift dress.

(Photos coming soon)

Since I have so much wax print fabric at the moment I decided to be ambitious and try to make a blazer.  I had a black blazer that I loved ($10 from Ross on my last trip home!) but I managed to lose it (and my favourite green rain jacket) after not securing it properly to my bike rack on a nice sunny afternoon, somewhere between my office and the Waterloo station in Lower Hutt.

I reviewed a number of options but decided that princess seams would be the most flattering – so I picked Burda 7135:

7135

I’m went with version “A” – the shorter one, and didn’t realise I would be giving myself multiple headaches with all the new techniques I am trying to figure out with this one.

Burda Style has some good Blazer patterns – mostly sourced from the Burda Style Magazine, but they are only available as “print-at-home” patterns which I find to be a bit of a pain, so I went with what I could find at the shop.

Quite a challenging project, but hopefully will be worth the effort when finished.  It took me 3 hours just to lay out the pattern pieces and cut out the main fabric & lining.

My biggest difficulties thus far have been the welt pockets, the sleeves and the collar, all of which involve techniques new to me.

My welts look like a disaster, but luckily they are covered by these little pocket flaps so hopefully won’t mar the finished product.

The sleeves have been holding me up recently – I have never sewn anything with 2 sleeve pieces (the upper sleeve and an under-sleeve).  My pattern copying instructor said that having an under sleeve pattern piece cut on a different grain to the upper sleeve allows for more movement and ease – often used in jackets.  I finally figured out last night (after setting them in, thinking some thing was wrong, unpicking my sewing, swapping them around, then undoing it again thinking I had it right the first time) that I had sewn one of the sleeves inside out (it’s hard to tell with the print I am using) – so I had 2 left sleeves, hence all the confusion, and sewing/unpicking and thinking something was wrong.  So I have properly set in the sleeves as of this morning, and now the only thing left to do it put in the lining and hem it.

However, before I put the lining in, I need to fix the collar and lapels.  They are a hot mess!

I’m not crazy about the lower notched lapel extending more than the upper lapel (see image above).  But, it’s cut out and sewn up so I will leave it for the moment, and concentrate on getting them to look semi-good for the moment.  I think I need to re-sew some edged and clip some corners, maybe do some understitching which I have heard is helpful for collars.

I was really feeling like a sewing failure after all the sleeve issues, but I tried to remind myself this was a first for me, and a learning process.

Essentially this jacket, when finished, will end up being more of a muslin for me anyway, as I think I will need to make some serious sizing adjustments.  However, if the end result is a fabulously well-tailored, fitted blazer in an amazing beautiful African print, that is a one-of-a-kind awesome part of my wardrobe that I can wear to conferences and present papers in and feel like a sexy librarian academic superstar, then it will all be worth it!

Also I enjoy sewing, despite all the headaches it gives me!

 

 

 

All the young dudes

So I went to see Grimes last night here in Wellington.  It was a pretty fun gig but it was definitely a very young crowd, full of young sweaty bodies pressed up against each other, rubbing up on each other, even old ladies like me.  At one point Grimes even brought a girl up on stage who looked as if she was about to be crushed by the audience.  It’s been a while since I attended a gig that was full of such excitement and energy… I could actually feel it emanating from the crowd.  I wonder if this increased and palpable energy was because of Grimes’s fame or a connection with her music?  I think the last time I experienced a same kind of energy was at Laneway last year, which was also full of pretty famous bands that people were really excited to see.  I suppose it must be a combination of the two – not only are you able to be in such close physical proximity to some one who’s world famous, but you feel like you have this deeply personal connection to them and their music.

Anyway, I tried to take a few pictures but it was so crowded and hot and sweaty that none of them turned out that awesome.

Here they are:

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new zealand music month

It’s New Zealand music month and to celebrate I am encouraging people out there in other countries to enjoy some fine NZ music.

I will admit that upon first moving here, I wasn’t much impressed by anything I heard from local acts.  But as time has gone on, my opinions have changed as I have discovered some sweet jams.

One of my very favourites is Fraser Ross.  Not only is his music amazingly awesome, but he is my former neighbour.  Fraser has recently departed the fair heights of Coromandel Street for the Scottish Highlands in pursuit of love, and I wish him all the best.  I first met Frase at our yearly Christmas neighborhood bbq this past year, and when he told me he had a special lady friend in Scotland I asked him how they met.  With a completely straight face, he told me they met online.  I very innocently believed him.  About 30 seconds later he told me he was just kidding and they met here in Wellington, and 6 months later when I heard he was moving overseas to be with her I was really glad, though of course I’m sad to lose such a wonderfully musical pal & neighbour.  As I know well, long distance relationships aren’t easy, so I’m really happy for him as he makes a go of his musical career closer to his sweetheart!

His new EP is called “To Places” and features some really sweet melodies.

I recommend a listen.

Another local act I adore is called Glass Vaults.  It helps of course that the band is comprised of a trio of handsome gentlemen.  Their musical style is a big hard to describe, though according to their bandcamp site it’s been called “post-ambient” and “glacial pop”.  Whatever name you give it, it’s lovely.

They also make some awesome music videos and are clearly just really talented boys.

I’m a big fan of the fabulous folks from Orchestra of Spheres.

They wear amazing costumes, sound like they’re from outer space, ride bikes, and are awesomely dedicated to supporting experimental music around town.  Also they have really mastered the art of having on-stage personas.  By day they are book editors and music teachers, by night, Orchestra of Spheres turns into:

Baba Rossa – biscuit tin guitar, sexomouse marimba
EtonalE – electric carillon
Jemi Hemi Mandala – drumkit
Mos Iocos – keyboard, gamelan

Another former neighbour of mine plays in the band Phoenix Foundation.  They’re quite popular here in NZ and were even musical guests on a BBC programme.  I think that means they’re famous?  After hearing he was in a “famous” band,  I actually tried to ask my neighbour if he was considered “famous” and if people recognised him in public, and he reluctantly admitted it.  I don’t know why NZers would feel uncomfortable about admitting fame… isn’t being famous the whole point of being a rock star?!?!  I guess it’s just a testament to the very humble down-to-earth nature of most people in the country.

My pal Matt the music librarian at the National Library of New Zealand is in Golden Awesome, a band definitely worth checking out.

Matt, being an excellent librarian, also compiled and posted an album of NZ music on the National Library website, all songs freely available under the creative commons licence.

It’s called the Turnbull Mixtape, after the Turnbull Library, a national institution dedicated to preserving NZ culture.

Aren’t librarians awesome?

There are literally dozens of other bands I would love to describe in this post, but unfortunately due to time constraints only my top 5 have made it.  Others worth checking out in Wellington include:

The Blue Onesies

The Shocking & the Stunning

Jetsam Isles

Sunken Seas

Terror of the Deep

Paper Scissors

French for Rabbits

Newtown Rocksteady

Thought Creature

…and more!

the cultural onion of perpetual sexism

Normally I avoid Vice like the plague, but Ticker sent me a link to a Vice article about sandals (I always said sport sandals were gross!), and then I read this article as well:

Mind Thoughts… with Michael Ian Black – Let’s Not Fuck, Shall We?

By Michael Ian Black

Here’s the thing, ladies: I don’t want to have sex with you. I know I’m supposed to. I’m supposed to want sex the way a guy in a beer commercial wants a brew: consuming my every thought, driving my every impulse, fueling my workouts, rousing me from slumber, inspiring my creativity, and propelling me through Abercrombie & Fitch with my credit card out, saliva dribbling from the corners of my mouth, and semen leaking from the pant legs of my skinny jeans. But I don’t. And I bet a lot of other guys don’t, either.

Male libido is assumed to be a constant, quivering thrum. For some men, maybe it is. But for me, as much as I enjoy the old in-n-out, the rubba-dub-dubba, the squeak-n-bubble, I have never craved it the way our culture has led me to believe I should, not even during my fabled Horny Years from ’91 to ’95. Except for those moments when I was in the first throes of a new love, sex has never subsumed me. Yet every cultural message I receive has led me to believe it should. Consequently, my lack of nymphomaniacal tendencies has always left me feeling embarrassed and emasculated.

It’s a topic I never hear men discuss. Men assume each other to be as randy as baboons during red butt season. When we discuss sex at all, we talk about it in terms of desire, never a lack of desire. Never have I been at a backyard barbecue and heard, “Man, what I wouldn’t give to not fuck Angelina Jolie.” Or “Bro, given the choice between having sex with some random bitch or reading a good book, I’d probably choose the book.”

But that’s how I feel. I just don’t want sex that much.

It’s strange. Men feel like they have to conform to some idea of masculinity that bears the same relationship to normal sexuality as professional bodybuilding does to normal human musculature. Was it always like this? Did men always have this pressure on them to maintain (or pretend to maintain) a hypertrophic sex drive?

Why is sex such a dominant cultural theme now, and why does it seem to only be getting worse? Women have been rightly bitching about this for years, but men never seem to complain. Personally, I hate it. I hate the way men are stereotyped as sex-starved cock robots. It’s just such a basic pop culture premise that it doesn’t even get questioned; men want to fuck. All the time. Ideally while watching shit blow up.

But masculinity is far more complicated and subtle than that. Yes, it involves getting laid. But for me, fucking isn’t even in the top five attributes of what it means to be a man. My top five are:

  • Providing
  • Producing
  • Strength
  • Loyalty
  • Farting

Fucking comes sixth. To me, sex isn’t even about sex. Fundamentally, it’s about acceptance, having somebody desire you enough to allow you to envelop them and wanting that person to envelop you in return. When the culture tells me I’m not having enough of it, it seems like what it’s telling me is that the culture itself does not accept me. What can I do to become more acceptable? Buy those jeans, drive that car, smother myself in Axe body spray. It’s a losing battle. I can never accumulate enough stuff—money, lovers—to satisfy the itch our shitty culture is causing. If anything, it’s like a venereal disease; the more I scratch at it, the worse I end up feeling.

I want to be a good man. I feel like I am a good man. I’m just not a horny man. Unless we’re talking about BJs.

First, a disclaimer.  While I do consider myself a social scientist, I am not a student of gender studies or women’s studies.  I have some background understanding of the relevant theory in this field (De Beauvoir, Butler, Irigaray, Kristeva), however I am basically talking out my ass, so don’t get mad at me.

Reading the above article prompted the following response:

This is a very well written, witty, articulate article.  I appreciate this kind of neo-masculinity and applaud the author addressing a situation that many men would feel uncomfortable broaching, however when I look at the list of “Top 5 attributes” what being a man means to you, I can’t help but notice that the first 2 (“Providing” & “Producing”) are simply perpetuating another long existing dominant cultural theme. However rather than oppressing women by sexually objectifying us, you are asserting your financial dominance over us and limiting our autonomy and independence by assuming the role of provider or producer.
This is why I think that until women stop this BS expectation that men have to buy us shit and pay for dinner, we’ll continue to earn less wages for the same work and remain subjugated to the existing male hegemony.  It’s only through asserting our own financial independence and rejecting the status quo of male partners being the breadwinner will we ever truly be free!
Therefore I would suggest thinking more deeply about what attributes are important to you in defining yourself as a man, and reflect on their underlying assumptions, and see if you still feel the same way.
Maybe “fucking” will end up being one of the top 5!

I understand that my response might seem overly critical, which was not my intention. I’m just suggesting that it’s important to consider underlying social and cultural assumptions that influence how people define themselves as men or women and the stereotypes they can perpetuate unintentionally.

Which got me thinking about Cutler’s Cultural Onion, which I have mentioned before:

Which then got me thinking about what attributes are important to me in how I define myself as a woman, and the assumptions they might be based on.

I really struggled with this.  How do you define femininity?  What qualities are inherently feminine?  It’s difficult to define oneself as a women without some reference to existing stereotypes, hereto-normative assumptions, or mass-media conditioning on what women are or how women should behave.

The ones I eventually came up with, for myself, in no order, are:

  • Compassion
  • Diligence
  • Autonomy
  • Idealism
  • Sociability

I realise that a lot of these qualities are not inherently feminine or masculine, and neither are they universal.  This is a personal list of what attributes I think define myself as a woman.

However, I do think compassion, or empathy, is generally stronger in women than men.  I also think that any given woman probably does 2 to 3 times as much work as any man in any given 24 hour period.  I’m not calling all men apathetic and lazy (or am I?!), I’m just saying that women (myself and women I know in particular) seem to have double or triple the workload of most men I know.  I feel like my independence and autonomy are paramount to how I define myself as a woman – meaning don’t you dare ever try and tell me what to do!  I also think my idealism is part of my female persona.

Sociability, on the other hand, I can back of up with real evidence of it being a feminine trait.  I read somewhere (and maybe if I get some of the billion things on my to-do list done I might actually chase down the original citation) that men are more likely to be introverted than women.  I suspect (and again, this might be based on shit I read ages ago and have buried somewhere in the back of my mind) that this natural tendency towards extroversion of sociability has an evolutionary advantage.  Back in prehistoric times, proto-humans and modern homo sapiens were nomadic, hunter gathers for thousands of years.  The men went out and hunted, the women stayed in camp and gathered berries and looked after the babies.  Men didn’t have to interact to survive – they could easily spend weeks out on the glacier hunting down a woolly mammoth solo.  Women on the other hand had to cooperate to survive.  In addition, generally speaking women are usually the primary caregivers to children.  Again, this is forced socialisation.  Women have to spend time with their children and interact with them.  Men do too, but perhaps not to the same extent, at least historically, though this may be changing.  Women don’t have the luxury of being able to be introverted anti-social hermits.   Our survival, and the survival of our offspring, depends on our ability to socialise.

I think it’s interesting to point out that none of my attributes appear on Michael Ian Black’s list.  Though I don’t deny that farting is important, being strong, producing, providing, and being loyal are not of paramount importance to me.   I think having compassion for the life around you (human, plant or animal) and contributing to your community is more important than producing profit or providing material goods.  Perhaps this reflects the very different nature of how men and women think?  This is probably also why I will always be poor.

Anyway, I think this has been an interesting exercise, forcing me to think not in terms of a dichotomy of male vs female traits, but in terms of what aspects of my persona are particularly feminine, or important to me in my conceptualisation of my own femaleness, and why that might be.

I hope that made sense.

Anyway, if you are a woman, or a man, and would like to share your “top 5 attributes of what it means to be a woman/man”, please do.  I think it’s a really good opportunity for us to examine how we define ourselves based on sex, and the often unconscious assumptions that underlay our conceptualisations of gender.

Ovarian-Psycos Bicycle Brigade

I just wanted to share this awesome article I came across thanks to Venusradiockut.wordpress.com

The Ovarian-Psycos Bicycle Brigade Make a Space for Women on the Eastside

by Kris Fortin from LA Streets Blog

The Ovarian-Psycos Bicycle Brigade is a all-women bicycle group based out of the Eastside. Xela de la X of the Ovarian-Psycos Bicycle Brigade throws up the Ova’s sign with the rest of the group in the background. Photo by Rafael Cardenas via EastsiderWriter.com

(We’re working on a photo essay tomorrow following up on today’s story.  So, come back Monday. D)

Two months ago, when 22-year-old Bree’Anna Guzman was murdered in Lincoln Heights, the all-women bike group Ovarian-Pscyos Bicycle Brigade scrapped their previously planned ride to ride instead through the neighborhood to protest the killing.

“Whose Streets,” one woman called out.

“Our Streets” the more than 30 women riding answered.

While many recent bike groups are either bicycling for recreation, bringing awareness to bicyclists on the road, or use the bicycle for social justice movement events, the Ovarian-Psycos Bicycle Brigade is a community inspired women’s movement that does all of the above and then some.

In Los Angeles, fewer than 1 in 5 people cycling were female, according to preliminary data from the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition’s most recent bicycle count. While this trend has been the constant in cities across the nation, the number of female bicycle groups in Los Angeles has grown from just a couple a few years ago, to at least four.

The currently all-Latina collective with roots from various parts of the Eastside pride themselves with their exclusivity to women, with sticker slogans like “Ovaries so big, we don’t need no fucking balls.” Their monthly all-women Luna Rides, which takes its name from the moons connection with a woman’s menstrual cycle, bring up to 30 women riders each ride. For their two-year anniversary in July, the Ovarian-Psycos are also planning the first female version of the monthly Critical Mass, which will be called Clitoral Mass.

For many of the women it’s their first time being involved in an all-female collective. The oldest members are 33 and the youngest is 20. Some are artists that ride bikes, and some are pure bicyclists. Yet the Ovarian-Psycos has become a type of sisterhood that, for many, they have never had before.

“Being around women, learning that we can interact in a way that was not hostile or competitive; it’s been a very new experience,” said Magally “Maga” Miranda.

Though the group has found stability recently, the group’s continued existence was never a sure bet. On the very first Luna Ride in July 2010, Xela, the de facto leader of the group at the time, hit a pothole on the road and fell face forward off her bike, hospitalizing her for one week.  Andrea Ramirez, or “La Blackbird,” recalls that many bike riders didn’t come back after the first ride because they were scared.

Though one half left, and another came back for the second Luna Ride, Xela said, the group stagnated for the first year, never topping more than 20 riders.

“I was worried always that it’s going to die someday,” Xela said.

The Ovas wait at Olvera Street to start their Take Back the Night Ride, where they rode to protest the murder of a 22-year-old woman from Lincoln Heights. Photo by GLoTography

Yet, right before the Ovarians one-year anniversary, Xela started to recruit core members to better organize the group.  After the one-year anniversary at Solidarty ink, and with a fairly consistent 12 core members, the group finally started to take off. Like before, each ride had a theme. Specific workshops involved speakers, and teachers on a range of social issues, and bicycle issues. Some workshops talked about women’s health, while other covered self-defense. Yet, the groups were getting bigger, and the core members were helping spread the word.

Many of the women say they feel they are not taken seriously in the biking community because their rides aren’t as long as traditional rides, there are usually many first-time riders, and the ride will stop and wait for one person. But, these limitations, Ova member Natalie Fraire said, can be a positive.

“We are encouraging a lot more riders and that’s more important,” said Fraire.

Riding as a women group has also made the riders more aware of the difficulties of riding in the city as a woman. Individually, or in small groups, Ova Elvira “Ashes” Arvizo has been catcalled by men on the street, and during one Luna Ride, the group noticed a male motorist was trailing the group. The women stopped and started to yell at the motorist, which caused him to flee.

Creating Sisterhood

As the group has grown, the women have needed to get closer. Many of their biweekly meetings resemble the chaos of a family dinner. At a recent meeting, Maryann “La Fingers” Aguirre would belch across the room, giving many of the girls a laugh, and Fraire ran to the oven to find she burned the artichoke dish brought. If the meeting ever got out of order, a clit checker (meeting organizer) would bellow out a warning to get the meeting back on track.

Each Ova have brought various skills in community organizing, photography, graphic design and bike mechanics which they also share with the rest of the group. Gloria “GLoTography” Vasquez takes most of the photos that are on the groups websites, but she has also taken the time to teach Ovas like Fraire how to use a camera. The group has also helped Vasquez to break her shyness and talk more with women on rides.

“Now run into women across streets and able to converse with them than just pass them by,” said Vasquez.

Each season there are rotating leaders of the group called a left and right ovary, and many of the women are expected to step up to take care of a portion of their work.

Many of the women have never ridden with an all female bike crew, and let alone worked with an all-women group. Yet, the same reason Xela started the group is the same reason the women joined: they couldn’t connect with the rides already in LA.

Andrea “La Blackbird” Ramirez said she could never get comfortable riding with the Midnight Ridazz because men always outnumbered women. Aside from men outnumbering women during Critical Mass, Arvizo said will leave riders behind, and that can deter a young woman-rider to join a ride.

The Ovas end one of their bi-weekly meetings. Photo by Kris Fortin

The Ovas offer a space for women, Xela said. And the rides though recreational, can become extremely personal, with some events bringing women to tears. During a stop on their ride that was themed on domestic violence, many women came forward about their experiences.

The personal nature of the rides, and the already numerous LA bike rides is the reason Xela said, why it’s exclusive to women.

“It’s just a time for women. If they are trying to open up, won’t be comfortable opening up if there are men around,” said Aguirre.

Xela, whose been a part of women collectives that have never lasted, said she knew the Ovarian-Pscyos was a different type of all woman collective at the one-year anniversary. Jocelyn “Joss the boss” Hernandez brought a cake she made and designed to the group at the end of an interview at the Boyle Heights online radio station Centro de Comunicación Comunitaria. The cake had a symbol of a car with a slash over it.

“You do that for your sister, your best friend, and she did this for the Ovas. “That’s nice”

For more information on the Ovarians, send an email to ovarian.psycos@gmail.com or go to their website at ovarianpsycos.com.

And check out this sweet illustration they have created:

How awesome would it be to have a clitoral mass ride in Wellington!?

twenty twelve

The year started off with some bad luck (demagnetised debit card, banks closed, no money, a bent rear bicycle wheel and 133 km wind for days), but things seem to be looking brighter.

In particular, I am looking forward to the following events:

Films by Starlight

Wednesday 18 January – Exit Through The Gift Shop

Thursday 19 January – Bill Cunningham New York

Wednesday 25 January – Kaikohe Demolition

Thursday 26 January- Labyrinth

All happening in the Dell at the Botanic Gardens around dusk.

Loads of international acts coming to town!

Sun Araw on 3 February

Not my favourite band ever, but something to do.

Dan Deacon on 4 Febraury

I saw Dan Deacon several years ago in Montreal, and I have to say it was hands down one the funnest shows I have ever been to.  He was basically just playing music off his iPod, and got the entire audience (at Sala Rosa) to have a dance-off.  The full story is that I was almost forced to go and dance in front of the entire audience but thankfully the song ended just as eye contact was made and I narrowly escaped complete embarrassment. I’m certain good times will be had, and only $15!  What a value!

Real Estate 16 March

Pitchfork’s and All Song Considered’s darlings should put on a good show.

Wooden Shjips on 2 April

I like their music.

Camp a Low Hum in February not far from Wellington…

Camping!  Music!

I’m still undecided about Laneway (30 January in Auckland)… I asked my mum to buy me a ticket for Christmas.  We’ll see if she comes through.

Some cool things happening at Fred’s in the upcoming weeks…

The next few weeks look promising.  I’m going to all the above mentioned shows alone, except for CALH, but the loneliness of a girl at a show by herself doesn’t deter me.

Last weekend I went to see Bond Street Bridge and the Broken Heartbreakers at Meow.  The music was amazing, the venue awful.  The acoustics are terrible and the audience wouldn’t shut up!  Bond Street Bridge in particular was so lovely.  I had a chance to have a word with Sam after the show and guess what…. he’s a librarian!  Hence the ode to Sir Francis Drake and other obscure naval history references in his music.  I also asked Rachel from the Broken Heartbreakers to explain the etymology of the band’s name. Is it that they re-break previously broken hearts, or are they heartbreakers who are broken?  It turns out to be the latter.

I also went to see Beirut last week at the Opera House.  It was amazing, though I wish we had been closer!  Also the ushers at the Opera House take their jobs way, way too seriously.

After the show we went to Hawthorn Lounge, a lovely place I highly recommend, especially if you enjoy obscure cocktails in swanky surroundings and barmen with sleeve garters and bowties.    A nice lady gave us 1/2 a bottle of Prosecco and then I decided to head home.  I had to dash back to the Opera House to grab my bicycle… and guess who I saw loading out in the alley?  Not Zach Condon, but the rest of the band.  I wanted to say something, but being a star-struck super fan meant I could only manage “Hey that show was really great” to which I got a warm thank you and then I ran away feeling like an idiot.

It’s shaping up to be a fun-filled summer.  I hope to do more cycling, picnicking, sitting in the sun drinking bloody marys in the afternoon… oh and maybe getting some work done on my coding and analysis.  Right now Nvivo is giving me a headache so I am ignoring it.

I really like this song:

I hope that in 2012 there are more women rapping about “I guess that cunt getting eatin” whilst wearing cut-offs so short the pockets hang out.